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But the company is still committed to unlocking the FM chip in all phones and carriers

INDIANAPOLIS — NextRadio recently announced the launch of FM radio streaming capabilities for all smartphones, including an iOS version for iPhone mobile device users in Mexico , according to TagStation .

TagStation’s NextRadio app utilizes the enabled FM chip inside select Android devices to tune to local FM stations; if a listener’s Android device has the FM chip enabled, NextRadio saves data and battery life (when compared to streaming) and works when power is out and cell towers are down.

“We want to empower all users to enjoy local FM radio without having their content restricted by geographic location or choice of device,” Tagstation President Paul Brenner said in a press release.

Even though NextRadio now features the option to stream on unsupported devices, it is still committed to unlocking the FM chip in all phones. However, NextRadio developed this streaming version until the goal becomes a reality.

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The advocacy group called the FCC’s earlier decision arbitrary, capricious and contrary to LCRA

WASHINGTON — While the industry digests the 998 objections that Prometheus and two other advocacy groups filed with the FCC on May 17, the Federal Communications Commission has issued a firm “no” in a separate Prometheus filing — one that may be of interest to low-power FM stations, AM operators, LCRA supporters, and those watching for a future tug of war between AM radio stations and LPFMers.

Last year the Prometheus Radio Project filed a series of petitions with the FCC saying the commission’s 2017 formal order on the siting of cross-service translators for AM stations was arbitrary, capricious, contrary to the goals of the Local Community Radio Act of 2010, and insensitive to the needs of community-oriented noncommercial educational LPFM providers.

The issue surrounds the commission’s decision not to adopt a specifically defined distance limit on the siting of cross-service translators for AM stations with a 2 mV/m contour exceeding 25 miles.

As part of its AM revitalization efforts, the FCC amended a rule in February 2017 surrounding the siting of an FM translator that is rebroadcasting an AM station. The draft of this Second Report and Order differed from earlier documents in that it did not include any specific distance limits on the siting of translators.

This was done intentionally, the FCC said, to give AM stations flexibility in using a cross-service translator to serve its core market — assuming that it still did not extend its signal beyond the station’s core service area.

Prior to the circulation of this Second R&O draft, the rules were quite specific: a cross-service FM translator had to be located such that its 60 dBμ contour was contained within the lesser of either the AM station’s daytime 2 mV/m contour, or within a 25-mile radius centered at the AM station’s transmitter site.

As the FCC put it: “refraining from adopting a limit would be consistent with the objective, articulated in the [AM Revitalization Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking], to provide flexibility to an AM station using a cross- service translator.”

Prometheus objected, however. It argued that without the proposed 40-mile limit, expanded siting options for cross-service FM translators would lead to an increase in the short-spacing of low-power FM stations from multiple directions, and would significantly restrict incumbent LPFM stations’ ability to relocate in the event of lost transmitter sites.

The commission dismissed Prometheus’ objections at the time and went ahead and approved the Second R&O without any mention of the 40-mile limit. The commission said Prometheus neglected to quantify the number of LPFM stations that would be affected and noted that the new rules still made space for mandated minimum spacing and contour overlap protections.

Prometheus responded again with a stay petition and reconsideration petition and demanded a freeze on the processing of related applications.

The FCC again disagreed. “Despite Prometheus’s claims, the commission did not fail to account for any adverse impact that the order will have on LPFM stations,” the FCC said. “Rather, the commission found that the public interest benefits of providing greater flexibility for AM stations to locate cross-service translators, even beyond the 40-mile limit, were significant and that nothing in the record, including Prometheus’s February Ex Parte, demonstrated harm to LPFM stations that would outweigh these benefits.”

Nor does the commission agree with Prometheus’ assessment that it violated the LCRA by not adopting a set distance limit on siting of cross-service translators.

“[The order] addresses community needs by allowing improved primary service by AM broadcasters” such that the requirements of Section 5 of the LCRA have been met, the FCC said.

The commission rejected Prometheus in another way: its assessment that the FCC favored expansion of commercial stations, “many of which are controlled by large national ownership groups at the expense of noncommercial local LPFM,” Prometheus told the FCC.

Elimination of the set distance limit does not favor expansion of commercial stations at the expense of noncommercial stations, the FCC said. “The increased flexibility in siting of cross-service translators will benefit both commercial and noncommercial AM stations … [and] the potential for harm to noncommercial LPFM stations resulting from this increased flexibility is remote.”

As a result, the commission rejected Prometheus’s request for reconsideration and dismissed its stay petition as moot.

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image caption: Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) graduate Scott Taylor, who will be participating in the school’s June 2 Open House and June 1 Grad Panel Forum at CRAS’ Gilbert, Ariz. campus.

Gilbert, Ariz., May 23, 2018 – The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS; www.cras.edu), the premier institution for audio engineering education, will be opening the doors to its Gilbert, Ariz. campus (1205 N. Fiesta Blvd.) to prospective students, parents, and the media on Saturday, June 2 from 10am – 4pm. Three CRAS graduates will be on hand for the Open House, and they will also be part of an Open Panel Forum held for current CRAS students the evening of June 1.

“There are a host of opportunities for our students once they graduate, and we want to give them an idea of what’s out there first hand for them once they enter the open market,” said Kirt Hamm, CRAS administrator. “Besides our mandatory internship program, getting our students in touch with our graduates who either are working for others, or who have made the leap into self employment, is huge. That’s what this grad panel is about in our upcoming Open House. Continued education, networking, and learning what it takes for going out on one’s own by those who have done it already is of enormous value for any student.”

Hamm continued, “We also want prospective students and their parents to discover everything there is to know about a CRAS education, and with hard work and dedication just how successful they can be. For instance, every year, CRAS graduates populate, in great numbers, Grammy nominations for the year. Most recently, seven of our graduates worked on multiple 2018 Grammy Award-winning nominations by numerous artists. In total, 28 CRAS graduates worked on 26 Grammy-nominated albums and songs across 28 categories this past year.”

Members of the June Open House Grad Panel include:

· Micheal Peterson – engineer based out of L.A. He has held many positions including house engineer, head assistant engineer, light technician and has assisted in most management areas. He’s worked with Wiz Khalifa, Snoop, Miguel, Avenged Sevenfold, The Cult, Anthrax, Winery Dogs, Twenty One Pilots and the full Glee cast.

· Scott Taylor – stage manager and audio technician currently for Chris Issak; worked tours with Young The Giant (FOH engineer); Bush (systems engineer / FOH technician); Pat Benatar (FOH technician); Cher Lloyd (monitor engineer); Big Bad Voodoo Daddy (monitor engineer); My Darkest Days (drum/audio consultant); No Doubt (monitor engineer); Poison (monitor technician); Linkin Park (PA technician); Jimmy Buffett (PA technician / monitor technician); Prophets of Rage (monitor technician).

· Jordan McClain – foley cuer/editor/mixer at Sinc Sound in downtown L.A. Most recent work includes S.W.A.T., Atlanta, and Westworld.

At the June Open House, guests will be able to interact with CRAS faculty and get a taste of the curriculum and the state-or-the-art audio gear spread throughout its numerous classrooms as well as its 42-foot Mobile Broadcast Unit. They will also be able to participate in live demonstrations in many of these real world audio recording studios, live sound venue, and labs.

The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences is composed of two nearby campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz. A CRAS education includes Broadcast Audio, Live Sound, Audio Post for Film and TV, Music Production, Commercial Production and Video Game Audio, all taught by award-winning instructors who have excelled in their individual fields. CRAS’ structured programs, and highly qualified teaching staff, provide a professional and supportive atmosphere, which is complemented by its small class sizes allowing for individual instruction and assistance for students in engineering audio recordings. CRAS has been providing quality vocational training in Audio Recording for more than three decades. The curriculum and equipment are constantly being updated to keep pace with the rapid advancements in the music and sound recording industries. CRAS’ course offerings and subject matter have always centered around the skills and knowledge necessary for students’ success in the Audio Recording industries.

The 11-month program is designed to allow every student access to learn and train in all of the Conservatory’s studios which are comprised with state-of-the-art audio recording and mixing gear, the same equipment used in today’s finest studios and remote broadcast facilities, including Pro Tools 12, API Legacy consoles, SSL G+ and AWS consoles, Studer Vista consoles, and much more. All students must complete a 280-hour industry internship to graduate from the Master Recording Program II that may ultimately lead to industry employment.

“We want everyone to see, hear, and feel how our 11-month program focuses exclusively on what a student needs to know to begin living their passion in any one of the many facets of the Recording Arts,” Hamm concluded.

For more information on the Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences, please visit www.cras.edu, contact Kirt Hamm, administrator, at 1-800-562-6383, or email to info@cras.edu.

About The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences

Based in the heart of The Valley of the Sun with two campuses in Gilbert and Tempe, Ariz., The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (CRAS) is one of the country’s premier institutions for audio education. The Conservatory has developed a unique and highly effective way to help the future audio professional launch their careers in the recording industry and other related professional audio categories.

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L.A.W.N. operation made easier by new network control platform



GTX24HHB

STOW, OHIO — Alteros, an Audio-Technica company, has introduced two new handheld transmitters — the GTX24HHP live performer handheld and GTX24HHB broadcast handheld (shown) — along with remote and network control software platform that makes it easier to set up and operate the GTX Series L.A.W.N. (Local Area Wireless microphone Network) Ultra-Wideband (UWB) wireless microphone system.

WIRELESS MIC SYSTEM

A 6.5 GHz digital system, the GTX Series L.A.W.N. UWB system offers immunity to radio frequency spectrum regulatory changes, bandwidth loss and channel crowding, resulting in interference-free performance, even in the most demanding live broadcast settings, the company says.

The L.A.W.N. system enables operation outside the crowded UHF spectrum, free from database registration, licensing, complex support equipment, and even RF frequency coordination. It supports repeated deployment, from studio-to-studio and location-to-location, of 24 simultaneous, low latency (<3ms), 48 kHz/24-bit audio channels in any indoor or outdoor broadcast or performance environment, according to A-T.

HANDHELD MIC TRANSMITTERS

Available this summer, the GTX24HHP “performer” and GTX24HHB “broadcaster” microphone transmitters join a product line that includes the GTX3224 control unit, GTX24 bodypack transmitter, and GTX32 transceiver.

Intended for live performance, the GTX24HHP “performer” wireless handheld mic features a lightweight, ergonomic design that accepts popular thread-on microphone capsules using a 1.25-inch /28-thread pitch. This allows performers to select their preferred mic sound and performance from a wide range of manufacturers, including new Audio-Technica capsules.

The GTX24HHB “broadcaster” wireless handheld mic includes a dedicated “flag mount” section and incorporated “talkback button,” while incorporating interchangeable mic capsule mounts for maximum sound and performance flexibility.

According to Alteros President and CTO Jackie Green, “Modern facilities and systems are taking advantage of IP-based networking technology to reduce operational costs, simplify workflows, ensure … production quality, and even simplify equipment setup and operation.”

The Alteros R&D team worked closely with key professionals in the live, touring and broadcast markets to identify their desired workflows, interfaces and functionality.

The resulting Ethernet-based system allows easier setup, control, monitoring, naming, and network and clock management via a sophisticated user interface that can be accessed directly or remotely on multiple device platforms.

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Neutrik  NA2-IO-DLINE Dante I/O Interface

Charlotte, NC – InfoComm Booth C1642… Neutrik USA, the leading supplier of robust and reliable professional connectivity solutions for audio, video, and data, announces the NA2-IO-DLINE Dante I/O Interface. A 2-in / 2-out device, the Neutrik NA2-IO-DLINE simultaneously converts analog signals to Dante and Dante signals to analog. Genuine Neutrik input and output XLRs, along with a locking etherCON connector, provide professional-level connectivity. Four LED indicators provide network status as well as DANTE SYS and SYNC status.

Uniquely rugged and portable, the NA2-IO-DLINE is an ideal interface solution for everything from installed AV applications to the most challenging stage conditions. For utmost versatility, the unit’s rubber protection can be removed. Optional mounting brackets and rackmount panels are available for attaching the NA2-IO-DLINE to floors, walls, tables, or racks.

With the ability to transmit signals up to 100 meters (328 feet) via CAT5e cable, the new NA2-IO-DLINE functions with nearly any network switch that provides Power over Ethernet or else a PoE injector. Creating and saving routing configurations is quick and easy using Audinate’s free Dante Controller software. The NA2-IO-DLINE is AES67 compliant.

Peter Milbery, President of Neutrik USA commented on the company’s new NA2-IO-DLINE Dante interface, “The NA2-IO-DLINE’s single or bi-directional operation makes it easy to manage a substantial sized setup while enabling older legacy devices to fit right in—thus extending their useful life cycle. The interface has been designed to fit seamlessly into a wide range of environments and its rugged design inspires confidence that, as always, Neutrik is at the forefront of connectivity solutions. I have every confidence that live event production professionals and AV integrators will find much to like.”

Neutrik’s NA2-IO-DLINE Dante I/O Interface is expected to become available Q3, 2018.

About Neutrik USA

Headquartered in Charlotte, NC, Neutrik USA, a subsidiary of Neutrik AG, is the leading supplier of robust and reliable professional connectivity solutions. Neutrik manufactures a wide array of XLR connectors and receptacles, jacks and plugs, fiber optic connector systems, wireless systems and accessories for a broad range of customers ranging from rock bands to lighting design and industrial equipment to broadcast studios. For more information, please visit Neutrik USA online at http://www.neutrik.us/ , http://www.experience-neutrik.com/ , and become a part of its social network family at www.facebook.com/Neutrik and https://twitter.com/NeutrikOfficial .

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Brooklyn, NY – Pro Sound Effects®, the next level sound effects library company, has released Gators – a one-of-a-kind sound library featuring stunning alligator sound effects from bellowing mating calls to monstrous growls, aggressive hisses, and vicious jaw snaps.

There is a reason you will not find another sound library dedicated to alligator or crocodile recordings anywhere else. These sounds can not only be dangerous to record, but they are extremely difficult to capture as alligators are typically very stealthy, quiet creatures. That’s why recordist Colin Hart and his team embarked on several excursions to the swamps of Florida over many years to develop a method for cueing their unique sounds.

“When I first began recording these alligator sounds, I unknowingly set out on a journey that would take seven years to complete,” says recordist Colin Hart. “The result is an impressively large alligator library with unreal recordings that still captivate me every time I hear them.”

Delivered in 24-bit/192kHz and 24-bit/96kHz, each sound file in Gators is embedded with descriptive metadata for lightning fast search. Use Gators as your secret weapon for creature sound design to give life to monsters, dragons, and dinosaurs – as well as to add character to explosions, thunder, fire, engines and more.

Gators Key Features:

  • 75 sounds (520MB)
  • 24-bit/192kHz and 24-bit/96kHz broadcast .wav files
  • Descriptive embedded metadata
  • 100% Royalty-Free
  • Download or flash drive delivery (+$40)
  • Free Sampler available for download (2 sounds, 4.5MB)

View Gators Full Features & Download Free Sampler

Pricing & Availability

The Gators sound effects library is available now at $149 for a one-user lifetime license. A free sampler including two WAV files selected from the library is available for immediate download at prosoundeffects.com/gators .

2+ users? Contact licensing@prosoundeffects.com.

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Biamp Will Lead Design, CTS Certification, Audio Over IP, Video Compression, Microphone Technology, and Room Solutions Sessions

BEAVERTON, OregonMay 22, 2018 — Biamp Systems, a leading provider of innovative, networked media systems, has announced a robust lineup of educational and speaking sessions at InfoComm 2018, June 6-8 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. As part of InfoComm’s three-day educational offering, Biamp’s L. William Nattress III — CTS-D, CTS-I, director of consultant relations — will lead “CTS-D Prep” while Jake Corlett — CTS-D, CTS-I, InfoComm adjunct faculty instructor and Biamp regional manager — will co-lead “AV Design Level 1: Environment,” both offered June 2-4, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

In addition, Biamp will present several seminars to guide attendees through the latest innovations, trends, and hurdles related to audio over IP, video compression, microphone technology, and room standardization. InfoComm 2018 sessions include:

AVB/TSN: Ethernet and IP for Audio, Video and Beyond
Wednesday, June 6, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Biamp’s Geordie Klueber (field sales engineer), presenting on behalf of the Avnu Alliance, will join Richard Bugg of Meyer Sound (digital products solutions architect) to address the primary challenges of real-time audio and video on standard networks, how different technologies and protocols can address each challenge, and the equipment and tools to show real-world application. Attendees can earn 1.5 RU toward their CTS, CTS-D, or CTS-I certification.

Microphone Arrays, Beamforming & Voice Tracking Technologies
Wednesday, June 6, 1 – 2 p.m.
Led by Biamp’s Zach Snook (audio products manager) and Rob Houston (UC product manager), this audio seminar will help AV professionals understand the principles of the technology behind microphone arrays and beamforming, comprehend the capabilities beamforming and voice tracking offer and how they differ from conventional microphones, and cover a typical implementation process. Attendees can earn 1 RU toward their CTS, CTS-D, or CTS-I certification.

Success in Standardized Room Solutions
Thursday, June 7, 8 – 10 a.m.
In this technology management seminar, Nattress will help attendees understand standardized room solutions by planning a long-term, sustainable technology strategy to build and evolve classroom and meeting room spaces. Attendees can earn 2 RU toward their CTS, CTS-D, or CTS-I certification.

The Ins & Outs of Video Compression Algorithms
Thursday, June 7, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
This talk, led by Biamp’s Video Product Manager Chris Fitzsimmons and Dobil Laboratories’ Tom Mclaughlin, director of technical operations, aims to examine the need for compression, its underlying technologies, explain the available options, and provide guidance on when best to apply each. Attendees can earn 1 RU toward their CTS, CTS-D, or CTS-I certification.

Additional information about the InfoComm 2018 education sessions is available at www.infocommshow.org .

More information on Biamp’s full product portfolio is available at www.biamp.com .

Visit Biamp at InfoComm 2018, Booth C1954

# # #

About Biamp Systems
Biamp Systems, LLC is a leading provider of innovative, networked media systems that power the world’s most sophisticated audio/video installations. The company is recognized worldwide for delivering high-quality products and backing each one with a commitment to exceptional customer service.

Biamp is dedicated to creating products that drive the evolution of communication through sight and sound. The award-winning Biamp product suite includes: Tesira® media system for digital audio and video networking, Devio® collaboration tool for modern workplaces, Audia® digital audio platform, Nexia® digital signal processors, and Vocia® networked public address and voice evacuation system. Each has its own specific feature set that can be customized and integrated in a wide range of applications, including corporate boardrooms, conference centers, huddle rooms, performing arts venues, courtrooms, hospitals, transportation hubs, campuses, and multi-building facilities.

Founded in 1976, Biamp is headquartered in Beaverton, Oregon, USA, with additional engineering operations in Brisbane, Australia, and Rochester, New York. For more information on Biamp, please visit www.biamp.com.

PR Link: www.ingearpr.com/Biamp/180522Biamp.docx

Follow Biamp Systems:
Blog: blog.biamp.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/BiampSystems
LinkedIn: linkd.in/1aO2hjy
Twitter: twitter.com/Biamp
YouTube: bit.ly/BiampYouTube

All trademarks and registered trademarks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.

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Byron St. Clair, 93, Has Died

He was the “father of translators, LPTV and low-power FM” and the president emeritus of the National Translator Association


DENVER — Dr. Byron St. Clair, president emeritus of the National Translator Association, died May 20 in Denver of brain cancer. He was 93.

St. Clair, who served as president of the National Translator Association for 19 years, is known as the “father of translators, LPTV and low-power FM,” the association said.

He worked to serve those living in the mountainous rural western United States with broadcast service and in so doing created a new class of over-the-air broadcasting, which has grown to more than 4,000 stations that serve millions of people.

“Byron was a friend and mentor to all, a man of immense intellect, wisdom, ethics, kindness and vision,” said NTA President John Terrill.

During his career, St. Clair was director of R&D for Adler Electronics and founded and served as president of EMCEE, a manufacturer and installer of TV translators. In 1967, he founded and was president of Television Technology Corp. in Arvada, Colo., which later became Larcan-TTC.

St. Clair obtained a BSEE in 1945 and a master’s degree in physics in 1949 from Columbia University. He earned a Ph.D in physics in 1953 from Syracuse University.

He was a member of the National High Definition Television Subcommittees, Systems Subcommittee Working Party to Field Test Task Force, a board member of the Advanced Television Broadcast Alliance, a member and active participant in the Association of Federal Communications Consulting Engineers. St. Clair also was a member of the board of directors for Denver public broadcaster KBDI(TV).

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering recognized St. Clair in 2017 with its Jules Cohen Award for lifetime achievement.

The NTA is establishing The Byron W. St. Clair Memorial Scholarship Fund in partnership with the Association of Federal Communications Consulting Engineers for promising undergraduate and graduate students with an interest in a career in broadcast engineering at accredited U.S. universities and colleges.

St. Clair is survived by his wife of 71 years, Julie, and daughter Susan Hansen of Arvada, Colo. A memorial service will be held in June. Details were not immediately available.

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Says new insights will enable advertisers to measure and optimize ad campaigns


NEW YORK — The competition among broadcast groups for radio advertising dollars continues to escalate, due in no small measure to new technologies. The revolution began with the introduction of programmatic ad buying, which streamlined what had been a cumbersome process. At the same time, the drive towards better real-time analytics began. RW recently reported about Veritone’s announcement of partnerships with Beasley Media Group, Reach Media, the Tom Joyner Network, Townsquare Media and Results Radio, giving these broadcasters a license to use the Veritone aiWARE platform at their stations to process, transform, and review audio data in near real-time, with ad and content tracking, analytics.

The driving force behind much of this effort is bringing radio analysis to a parity with the traditionally more precise online media metrics. Now, iHeartMedia is jumping in with “iHeartMedia Analytics,” which it claims is the first fully-digital attribution service for broadcast radio. By leveraging the data from iHeartRadio’s digital ecosystem, the company claims, iHeartMedia will enable broadcast radio to measure and show results in the same way as digital media, giving advertisers easy access to campaign performance insights.

Brian Kaminsky, president of Revenue Operations and Insights for iHeartMedia, explained the logic behind this move: “We continue to see advertisers spend money on less effective mediums simply because they provide a perceived level of measurability and accountability. Now, marketers will be able to capitalize on the scale and reach of iHeartMedia’s more than 270 million monthly broadcast listeners. They can receive the same kind of real-time measurements, insights and custom reporting they are accustomed to getting from digital media, quantifying the full power of radio. In addition they can get attribution information that is missing from most of the digital marketplace.”

iHeartMedia Analytics is the latest addition to the company’s marketing optimization toolbox. It also includes SoundPoint, a programmatic real-time radio ad buying platform, and the recently introduced SmartAudio, which enables advertisers to do impression-based audience planning and dynamic radio ad creative that utilizes real-time triggers such as weather, pollen counts and sports scores.

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It’s a translation of the fourth edition of the “NATE Tower Climber Fall Protection Training Standard”


WASHINGTON — The National Association of Tower Erectors is now offering one of its primary resources in a Spanish language edition.

“Norma de Capacitación de Protección contra Caidas para Trepadores de Torres de la NATE” is the translated version of the fourth edition of the “NATE Tower Climber Fall Protection Training Standard.” The standard establishes the minimum requirements to which all tower climbers should be trained, and the NATE CTS outlines the individual standards for varying levels of tower climber expertise, as well as contains a Course Training Plan to demonstrate how to implement and utilize the NATE CTS and a Definitions section.

The Spanish edition is available online as a free resource for member companies, and the print format is available for both members and non-members to purchase.

“A Spanish language edition of the NATE CTS is crucial for the industry’s growing multicultural workforce. Making it accessible to a larger audience will help ensure all employees are adequately trained and maintain the highest level of safety standards,” Sindy Benavides, chief operating officer and acting CEO of the League of United Latin American Citizens said in a press release.

The association also said it plans to translate other resources to Spanish in the future. 

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